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42nd Santa Clara Easter Egg Hunt Not for Slow Pokes
Story and photos by Diane Andrews

At exactly 10 a.m., at the count of ten, City Councilmember Teresa O'Neill blew an air horn signaling the start of Santa Clara's 42nd Annual Easter Egg Hunt in Central Park on April 15. An estimated 1,500 really cute kids aged three to eight bolted like race horses at the starting gate. They ran as if their lives depended on it towards pastel-colored plastic eggs scattered on the ground inside three gigantic, roped-off circles on the softball fields.

And in a flash–maybe 60 seconds max–thirteen thousand Easter eggs had all disappeared into Easter baskets. Inside the eggs were treasures such as erasers, fake silver coins and tattoos. To keep it fair, one circle of eggs was for kids three to four, one for five to six-year-olds and one for seven to eight-year-olds.

"It's a big crowd, and the kids do feel they really have to compete for the eggs, but [my daughter Anjali] seems to have a good time," said Cupertino resident Ranjini Krishnan.

"I got 14 eggs," said five-year-old Anya Malhotra from Sunnyvale, Anjali's new friend. "I feel happy because I got so many eggs and inside are toys."

"I want her to experience the Easter things," said Anya's mom, Giovanna Malhotra. "We're Buddhist."

In the grassy meadow area of Central Park, a fenced-in "bunny trail" for special needs kids and those two and under was a popular addition this year. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., six families at a time were admitted, allowing parents to assist their babies and toddlers.

"This is a well-thought out arrangement for families with kids under two," said Santa Clara resident Praveen Kumar, attending the Easter event with his wife, Swetha Kumar, and their six-month old daughter, Prajna.

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Bobby O'Leary

The Art of Wonder: Triton ArtTours for Schools
Story and photo by Maria Judnick

The Art of Wonder: Triton ArtTours for Schools

It was a bright Wednesday morning as two third grade classes from San Jose Unified’s Grant Elementary School excitedly burst into the Triton Museum of Art. Thanks to a generous grant from The Mission City Community Fund and the Rotary Club of San Jose Silicon Valley and Foundation, these children are part of the 16 classes from Title 1 schools who have the opportunity...

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Grilled Cheese Champion Visits Books Inc on National Grilled Cheese Day
Story by Melissa McKenzie

Grilled Cheese Champion Visits Books Inc on National Grilled Cheese Day

The grilled cheese sandwich is a staple comfort food most people have been eating since childhood. Lovers of the sandwich pine for the perfect, metly, gooey grilled cheese, and its popularity has led to April 12 being named National Grilled Cheese Day. Santa Clara’s Books Inc...

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High School Girl Plays Boys’ Lacrosse
By David Alexander

High School Girl Plays Boys’ Lacrosse

At the youth level, one of the most important qualities a lacrosse goalie can have is the ability to fight the urge to flinch as the ball careens toward their face. In boy’s lacrosse, the ball travels roughly 70 mph–more than double the speed Korin Wheaton was used to on her girls’ team and roughly as fast as an F1 tornado...

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Santa Clara University’s de Saisset Museum Celebrates the Life of Paula Kirkeby
Story and photos by Cynthia Cheng

Santa Clara University’s de Saisset Museum Celebrates the Life of Paula Kirkeby

On April 6, a crowd gathered outside of Santa Clara University’s de Saisset Museum to view a new bench named “Homage to Paula Z. Kirkeby.” It is a long stone white structure with steps and raised features. Father Michael Engh, President of Santa Clara University, and Father William Rewak, Chancellor of Santa Clara University, blessed and dedicated the bench with holy water...

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Author Rebecca Walker Defies Stereotyping
Story and photos by Diane Andrews

Author Rebecca Walker Defies Stereotyping

New York Times best-selling author Rebecca Walker was born outside the box. She is the only child of Jewish American lawyer Mel Leventhal and African American writer Alice Walker, whose most well-known book is the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Color Purple..."

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This Week's Letters

We were shocked to learn about Steve Kelly’s most recent conflict of interest on the Santa Clara Planning Commission.

As Chair of the Santa Clara Planning Commission, Steve approves his own real estate rezoning deals.

We need representatives who seek and address neighbors’ concerns.

On Woodhams Road, there is a proposal to rezone a specific lot from 2 to 5 houses. This severely changes the character of the neighborhood.

Shockingly, Steve Kelly, Planning Commission Chairman, represents the buyer! When neighbors escalated conflict of interest concerns, Mr Kelly finally recused himself.  However, he retains significant influence and also profits significantly.

We need a fair, less biased, more objective process.

Karen Yee, Ann Heile

A city's charter review committee is a blue ribbon establishment of the city's best and brightest.  The City Council made an excellent decision last Tuesday by appointing good and smart people who were candidates and campaign leaders to study the electoral system.  Unfortunately an advocate of community hate and prejudice slipped in and the matter was cheered by yahoos with little intelligence who regard the matter as a joke.  The news to feel good about is that the City Council did an excellent job to examine the system with good people.  They lost a step, but took ten good ones.  That is still ninety percent!

James Rowen

Milestones is very entertaining, very informative. thank you... I'm a war baby. I'm schooled through college, went into the service USAF for 42 years, worked for the state of California for 40 years and have to laugh at decisions made by those who are 40 plus years my junior, who don't have a clue... The article about minimum wage was right on. It seems that it is not understood that the minimum wage was created for a reason. (Equal pay through out the US for some work accomplished) Giving the school kids paid work over the summer. Allowing them to earn something to have in their pocket for the school year. Nothing more. No one person was supposed to live on minimum wage. No one in my day (I was raised in Palo Alto 1954 to 1963) lived in this area (Santa Clara County) knowing that this would become one of the most expensive areas to live in the United States. Yes we still need unskilled labor for many a job here but not at the cost of everyone else. The souls on minimum wage, god bless them, some where along the line, one needs to get an education in the labor force (electrician, plumber, carpenter, auto mechanic etc.). Own your own business. If you choose a service industry that doesn't pay much more than minimum wage, oh well. Our "give me" society, our "you owe me" society has got to get a grip on life. You want it, work for it...

Thanks for listening
Jay Day

I could not agree more with the opinions expressed in your 4/12/17 editorial regarding our city council's decision to raise the minimum wage.

For the record I am not in business for myself nor am I currently in the work force.  But from the moment this issue started appearing on various city agendas it seemed like an inherently unfair move.  Why should city government dictate a certain wage for their community?   Maybe to look progressive compared to other communities?  But in my mind this amounts to "taxation without representation" in another form.

And after all our city had to go through with the end of the redevelopment agency in California and the claw backs that resulted, you would think our council would understand the feeling of having important financial decisions being made from the outside with a resulting big impact on our community. 

The minimum wage was not designed to be a living wage.  Raising the minimum wage indiscriminately raises the prices for everyone, including those who earn the minimum wage. As you pointed out.  It becomes a vicious cycle.  

I urge the council to reconsider implementing the next projected raise in the minimum wage in Santa Clara. Let's remember and appreciate the business women and men who take risks everyday striving to provide good services at a reasonable cost to our fellow citizens.  Why not support instead the teaching of practical job skills in our high school electives that will allow those entering the work force a better chance to succeed in jobs that will eventually

pay them a rate above the minimum wage based on acquired skills and work experience.

Ann Reynolds

Chargers Walk-off Victorious
By Andrew Bensch

Chargers Walk-off Victorious

In a non-league game with zero playoff implications, the Wilcox Chargers baseball team learned an important lesson against Piedmont on Tuesday: no lead is safe.

With a four-run lead, Wilcox Head Coach David Currie handed the ball to his usual shortstop–freshman Paul Rosa–to try and pitch the last three outs. Currie used eight pitchers in the game despite shutting out the Pirates through the first six innings. Having two league games on tap this week, Currie didn’t want to extend any of his usual arms and wanted to get work in for his less frequently used pitchers.

Unfortunately for Wilcox, Rosa would be unable to come up with the third out of the inning before giving up a tying two-run double to center field. Nick Malvini would relieve Rosa and get the final out of the inning with the score knotted up at four...

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Bruins Baseball Bearing Down, Searching for Respect
By Andrew Bensch

Bruins Baseball Bearing Down, Searching for Respect

For decades Wilcox High School has been king when it comes to baseball in Santa Clara. But in 2017, the Santa Clara High Bruins are looking to change that reputation. The Bruins frosh-soph squad is currently tied for first in their league with a 7-1 record. First year Head Coach Pedro Martinez, a 30-year-old Santa Clara native and Wilcox graduate would love to see the Bruins program eventually move up into the higher level to compete with his alma mater.

“I might be more hyped up about it than they are,” commented Martinez on possibly playing Wilcox in league play in the future. “One of the goals we put down was to win our league and when these kids are on varsity to move up to the A-division. To compete for a CCS title, get on a level that Wilcox has been on. [My kids] would love to play their rival school...

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Harris Lass Missing Painting Found in Storage Unit
Story by Melissa McKenzie

Harris Lass Missing Painting Found in Storage Unit

The mystery of a missing painting and two Santa Clara non-profits located a mile apart came to an end on April 8 when the long-lost painting of Captain Christian Lass was found in an unlikely location.

According to Lass’ great granddaughter, Betty Stevens, the painting was removed from the Harris Lass House for restoration by the late Austen Warburton on the day the City of Santa Clara took possession of the property at 1889 Market Street in 1987. At the time of Warburton’s death in 1995, the painting had not yet been returned.

Upon his death, and as planned, Warburton’s art collection was donated to the Triton Museum of Art, which also maintains and preserves artwork owned by the City...

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Kiwanis Turnaround Scholarship Helping Students for 50 Years
Story by Carolyn Schuk

Kiwanis Turnaround Scholarship Helping Students for 50 Years

Michael Hobson is the owner of Rookie's Sports Lodge in San José and a picture of all-American success.

But he wasn't always.

When Hobson was in the eighth grade he was expelled from school for having marijuana in his locker. "This threw out the whole balance of my life," he told guests at this year's Kiwanis Turnaround Scholarship fundraiser on March 29. Eventually he was able to return to high school. But the disruption in his life caused by a single act of bad judgment had lasting impact...

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